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US Police Use Finger Corpse to Open the iPhone

For the purpose of fact search, the police can do anything as long as it is legal and according to the rules. As the US police recently discovered that it was using corpse fingerprints, to unlock the iPhone screen, for the sake of investigation.

Fingerprint pattern types

 

This investigation method was already done by the US police since 2016 ago. This is confirmed by one of the FBI forensic experts, Bob Moledor. Launched infocommworld from Forbes , Monday (26/3/2018), Moledor told the first time this method is used on the bodies of suspected terrorists who shot dead the police.

This case occurred in 2016, but at that time this method failed because of time. Please note that if not used in more than 48 hours, iPhone will request passcode before using fingerprint. That’s why not all similar cases can be resolved by the police with this method.

However, this method is considered normal and legally valid. In his report Forbes also cited information from a nearby source of the federal police and he said, this method is no stranger to use let alone for drug cases.

In line with the police, lawyer Marina Medvin said these actions and methods have been very appropriate and worth doing by law enforcement officers. He also considered this does not violate the privacy of a person. According to him, when a person loses his life, automatically there is no longer privacy attached to him.

There is nothing else to protect so the method of using this corpse’s fingerprint is completely legal. “Once you share your information with someone, you lose control of that information You can not impose privacy rights when your friend’s cell phone is investigated and the police see a message from you to your colleague It also applies to the owner’s information,” Medvin.

Nevertheless this method still gets the pros and cons of some parties. In some legal investigations in the United States, police are forcing iPhone users to scan their fingerprints to unlock phones. The prevailing rules prohibit police from requesting passcodes, but there is no definite regulation governing privacy concerns regarding fingerprints.

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